An Introduction to Molecularly Isolated Magnetic Systems

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Date/Time:Thursday, 08 Apr 2010 from 4:10 pm to 5:00 pm
Location:Physics 5
Phone:515-294-0849
Channel:Condensed Matter Physics
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Michael Baker School of Chemistry, University of Manchester and Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble

Molecularly isolated magnetic systems, or magnetic molecules, provide a test bed for the investigation of zero dimensional magnetism. Such molecules are composed from a finite number of magnetically coupled metal ions, where each molecule is magnetically isolated from its neighbours. Progress in coordination chemistry has opened up a wide range of such systems and hence coupling topologies. Physical studies have revealed many interesting quantum phenomena, such as quantum tunnelling of magnetisation in ferromagnetic systems[1], and the quantum oscillation of total spin at avoided spin state crossings in antiferromagnetic wheels [2].


[1] L. Thomas, F. Lionti, R. Ballou, D. Gatteschi, R. Sessoli and B. Barbara, Nature, 1996, 383, 145 - 147.

[2] S. Carretta, P. Santini, G. Amoretti, T. Guidi, J. R. D. Copley, Y. Qiu, R. Caciuffo, G. Timco,
R. E. P. Winpenny, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 167401 (2008).