The Implications of the Higgs Discovery for Supersymmetry

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Date/Time:Tuesday, 09 Apr 2013 from 4:10 pm to 5:10 pm
Location:Physics 18/19
Contact:Chunhui Chen
Phone:515-294-5062
Channel:High Energy Physics
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Professor Jay Wacker, Stanford University

Supersymmetry is the leading candidate for physics beyond the Standard Model of Particle Physics. Not only can supersymmetry solve the hierarchy problem, but it also provides a natural candidate for the dark matter of the Universe and the additional particles induce coupling constant unification, a possible signal of grand unification. Nevertheless, after the first run of the LHC, the Higgs boson was discovered with a mass of 125 GeV and no superpartners were discovered. I will discuss the implications of the discovery the Higgs boson on supersymmetry. Within the context of the constrained minimal supersymmetric Standard Model, the mass of the Higgs boson and the non-discovery of superparticles are in fact linked. I will present the prospects for discovery of the first superparticles over the next several years and beyond.